My name is Eric Pousson. I grew up in South Louisiana, deep in the heart of Cajun Country. I met my wife Cecelia in 1998 and we’ve been married now for 21 years. Together we have 3 awesome kids. Chandler 20, Keira 12, and Aidan 10.

I’ve always loved food. My mother is from Monterrey, Mexico and as far back as I can remember she would always find herself in the kitchen preparing something amazing. In addition to the Mexican food culture I was exposed to, my father was Cajun so there’s that. Food was everywhere. Gumbo, crawfish, fresh seafood, tamales, homemade tortillas, you name it. Unfortunately I didn’t learn how to cook from my mother (that skill was reserved for my 2 sisters). I had to teach myself how to cook. No training, no technique, just passion. It’s an interesting journey when you are not bound by tradition. It was this passion that’s led me to where I am today.

I spent 20 years in the corporate world of sales and marketing. Worked my way to the top and eventually arrived at that high paying job with all the perks and expense accounts. I wonder if someone ever climbs Mount Everest only to be disappointed at what’s on top. That was me. I had climbed to the top of the career ladder and the view sucked!!

It was one fateful day in Oklahoma City where I had just finished dinner (alone) and I had an epiphany. As I sat in room 207 I knew that my life would never be the same again. A moment of clarity and my path, albeit uncertain made perfect sense.

It was in that moment I had decided to quit my executive position and start my own business doing the very thing I love to do. Cook. Cecelia loved the idea and for the first time in our marriage we would embark on the most exciting and rewarding adventure of our lives. Starting a family business.

The rest of the story hasn’t been told but I can tell you this. If you kindly subscribe to this site you’ll get to experience it with us first hand. Thanks for hanging out with me. Talk soon

20 thoughts on “About

  1. Eric
    Eric

    Hey Michael. I’ll try to give you a call tomorrow. Will you be around?

  2. Balagopal Menon
    Balagopal Menon

    Hello Eric,
    Greetings from India and Happy Thanksgiving

    I embarked on my sausage making journey about 4-5 years ago, guided by Michael Ruhlman’s book on charcuterie. Many failures, a couple of books and a lot of YouTube(have probably seen most of your videos)videos later feel I have reached a satisfactory level of making fresh and cooked including emulsified sausages.
    I have recently moved onto the next step and attempted curing pancetta which did turn out nice. I used Cure#1 the first time and am curing with Cure#2 the 2nd time around hoping I can eat this uncooked (will watch the weight loss).
    I am currently putting together equipment to build a drying chamber. As I am doing this, one question comes to my mind. Do I need a separate fermentation chamber or can I use the chamber I am building for both fermentation and drying. I do understand that the temp and humidity varies for both and also depending on the starter culture I use. Space and wife’s patience is limited(kidding, she’s been quite supportive of this hobby of mine), so can have only one chamber. Need your input on how I can manage one chamber for both functions. Thank you and have a great weekend with the family.

    1. Eric
      Eric

      You can use 1 chamber for both. At least you can for the first time. As soon as your chamber is full of product you then have to wait till it’s empty again to use it as a fermenting chamber. To use your drying chamber as your fermenting chamber you’ll need to increase the temperature (depending on your starter culture) and have your humidity set to 85%. After it’s finished fermenting just lower the temperature to 55F and 80% humidity. That’s it 🙂
      I’ll make a video and post on it so you can see the finer details.

      1. BALAGOPAL MENON
        BALAGOPAL MENON

        Hello Eric

        Thank you for your response. I am just starting out on cured meats, so unlikely my chamber is going to be full of product very soon. For all practical purposes, I will be adding small batches of different products. I will most likely start with T-SPX which I think requires a temp of 70F for the fermentation with a 85% humidity over 72 hours. So if I already have some meats drying in the chamber at lets say 55F at a 70%-80% humidity, would it affect the meats already inside if I were to, like you have suggested, to increase the temp and the humidity for 3 days to 70F and 85%-90% and then bring it back to where it was before to continue with the drying process?

        Also, do let me know once the video has been posted.

        Thanks again.

        1. Eric
          Eric

          Once you begin the drying process you will not want to change the settings in the chamber. This will negatively effect your drying salami. You will have to wait till its finished to ferment a different batch. Let me ask you this what is the room temperature where youlive?

          1. Balagopal Menon
            Balagopal Menon

            From now up until end of Jan, the temp will range between 70F-80F. Will then hit around 90F-95F in the summer.

          2. Eric
            Eric

            OK. For TSPX You can ferment at room temperature if you temp is below 85F. To ferment at room temperature all you have to do is wrap your salami in cling film and set it on the counter. The cling film will keep the humidity high and the room temp will ferment properly. Looks like you can only do this until January though.

  3. BALAGOPAL MENON
    BALAGOPAL MENON

    Thanks Eric, Working on limited time then!!!
    Also, what about cultures Bactoferm F-LC and F-RM-52. Dont these allow fermentation at higher temperatures??
    So, would it be safe to use cultures that allow fermentation at a higher temp even in warmer weather as long as I maintain the required humidity levels?
    One more question Eric, see a few recipes for Semi Dry sausages(dried under a month)…Does this mean that these are safe to eat uncooked..or do they need some amount of cooking?
    Thanks.

    1. Eric
      Eric

      Yes you do!! Those 2 cultures you mentioned do ferment at higher temps. The FLC can go both ways depending on what you are looking for. Typically if you ferment at higher temps with those cultures you are making a semi dried/tangy salami… If you want a salami that’s more traditional European Italian you can use Flavor of Italy (Flora Italia) or BLC007. Both of these can ferment at higher temps very fast and give you a nice salami. Typically semi dried sausages are cooked

      1. BALAGOPAL MENON
        BALAGOPAL MENON

        Hello Eric,
        Thanks for all the inputs. Hopefully will have my drying chamber ready by end of the week. But don’t think I can get started until I get the ph meter(Milwaukee MW102 for food) for which is going to take at least 3 weeks.
        Until then I shall dry the pancetta and the capocollo. I have cured the pancetta for 2 weeks in my refrigerator using Cure #2(wanting to eat this raw). The temp inside was around 37-40F. Y’day I rinsed and trussed the pancetta and hung it to dry in the pantry where the temp is in the range of 70F-72F with a humidity ranging from 80%-85%. It has been raining so the humidity does hit 90% on occasions. Will hang it for at least a month and then check the weight loss. Since I did not remove the fat cap, per your video a weight loss of 15%-20% should be ok. One thing, I have not covered the pancetta in a casing. Is that ok or should I cover it with a cheese cloth or something similar.
        Capocolo has just gone into the vac bag with the cure, so will leave it in the refrigerator for a week to 10 days.
        Thanks.

        1. Eric
          Eric

          70f is a little warm for hanging meat to dry. It will work but it will most likely begin to ferment as well as dry. You should cover the pancetta with some cheese cloth to help with the drying.. If your pancetta is very fatty (lets say 50-50) then 15% – 20% is perfect. If it’s very meaty then you’ll want to dry it longer..

  4. BALAGOPAL MENON
    BALAGOPAL MENON

    Ok. I had read a few articles where it said that 70F was ok to dry pancetta. Hope it just works out for me this time. Once I have my drying chamber ready, the temp should not be an issue.
    I did cover the pancetta with cheese cloth on Day 2 itself. As for the fat percentage, I would think it is 35% at best. Nevertheless, I will let it dry for a month and keep checking the weight loss on a weekly basis.
    Eric, is there any way I can upload a few pics?

    1. BALAGOPAL MENON
      BALAGOPAL MENON

      Hello Eric,

      Greetings for the New Year.
      After 4 1/2 weeks, have lost about 13% weight on the pancetta. Guess I will give it another couple of weeks to see where I end up.
      I am looking to buy a water activity meter. Anything you can suggest that I can get on Amazon. Please do let me know. Thanks.

      Cheers!

      1. Eric
        Eric

        Almost there… No clue about water activity meters. The ones i’ve seen on amazon have been in the $600 range with mediocre reviews..

        1. BALAGOPAL MENON
          BALAGOPAL MENON

          Hey Eric, good to hear from you.
          Noted about the water activity meter. Would you say that a dry sausage with weight loss in the range of 35% – 40% would be perfectly safe to eat and “shelf stable” as they call it, without having to check the water activity of the sausage.
          Thanks

  5. Antonio Andreacchi
    Antonio Andreacchi

    Hi Eric. When fermenting I’m my chamber do I need to separate hang each one ? Or can they be stacked on top of each other in a hotel pan ? Just wondering if the the temperature and humidity needs to surround the salami

    1. Eric
      Eric

      If your meat is the proper fermenting temperature you can stack them on top of each other without any issues (although some might get flattened in the process). What temp are you fermenting at?

  6. Ben
    Ben

    That’s a great story. How do you sell the product you make?

    1. Eric
      Eric

      Thanks. I’ll normally put it on my web site and what ever is available usually gets scooped up pretty quick..

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